Recipe

12 Days of Christmas: A Sharing Sesh // Day 6!

I started this 12 Days of Christmas series for two reasons: 1. I wanted to share parts of my life that I love with the world, and 2. Since deciding to step more fully into my desire to write, this was a little challenge I gave myself—write 12 days in a row.

So, here I am: Day 6. It's 11:25pm and I honestly don't know if I'll have this finished my midnight, but since I've already chosen what I'm sharing with you, I should be able to bang this puppy out.

I told you once before, in my first recipe post, that sharing recipes--sharing many things in life is not easy for me. It doesn't come naturally for me to say, "Here's something I know that you don't, so let me share it with you,"

Why wouldn't I want to share the things I know with others, any sane and healthy human might ask? Because then you might not need me. And if you don't need me, you may not want me.

There are a few aspects of being in community with others that I believe to be fundamental. In order to stay in a community (of any kind) a person must feel wanted, needed, appreciated, and have an overall sense of belonging.

Now, mind you, by me withholding parts of myself in order to manipulate others into needing or wanting me IS NOT the heart behind true community, and therefore not a part of myself I want to embrace. It's a part of my life that I've gradually surrendered over the years, but every time I share something I love with the world, it's still a difficult step forward for me.

Tonight, I'm sharing not one, but two recipes involving chai. I don't think tea comes naturally to Americans. Many cultures around the world have created and sustained customs around tea: customs that involve special cups and spices, some that involve special straws and others that use the drink as their cultural cue to leave soon.

The two recipes I have for you are two that I can safely say have no right to a special custom. In fact, I'm pretty sure they were both personal experiments in the kitchen at some point. That's why I don't bake, by the way (except for chocolate chip cookies); baking is too precise for me; there’s no wiggle room in baking, so the two of us don't create great results. Experiments though, that’s where the kitchen and I mesh—up until I want to make something a second time. Dilemma of dilemmas.

Both of these beverages are on the sweeter side, but can have a little kick with the chai depending on the type you use. You can play with the ratios too, in order to get them to your tasting preferences. Experiment away!

Recipe 1 // Chai Hot Chocolate

  • Make hot chocolate as you usually would. That is assuming you would absolutely and always make it with milk on the stove or else, go without. If you're response to that is, "no, I make it with water then we may need to talk."
  • Allow one chai teabag to steep in the hot chocolate pot.
  • Pour into your favorite mug and enjoy!

Recipe II // Chai Apple Cider

  • For this one, I usually use those boxes of chai you can get at TJ's or Starbucks or where ever, but it will also work with a lightly sweetened cup of steeped chai as well.
  • So, get whichever chai you choose
  • Get your bottle of apple cider
  • Cut them 1 to 1 in a pot on the stove
  • Repeat the last step from the first recipe.

I know, I know…both of these are essentially rocket science :). Enjoy, my friends!

12 Days of Christmas: A Sharing Sesh // Day 2

Community is not everything. Community is not everything, but it is necessary for a full life. Community is not easy, but is hard work. Nay nay, it is extremely hard work. It is hard work to fall short, to be humbled before others, to live so closely in the presence of others that we cannot hide our deepest, darkest selves. It’s easy to give up and walk away instead of face our inner selves with others.

Community is something that is formed, it is molded, and it changes over time. Community welcomes joy and celebration over jealousy. Community welcomes suffering and empathy over self-centered thinking. Community prioritizes the choosing of love. It calls us out and tears us down, while also lifting us up.

Community is made. It is made with those whom we chose to make it. Community is a two-way street. It is not always gentle and sometimes it is a downright pain in the ass that you kind of want to punch in the face; it is seemingly unworthy of the suffering it may cause.

Community is created in our homes and on the streets. It establishes itself in parks and on city streets, in public and in private. Community is a recipe made for a slow cooker. Community is read about in books, but seldom lived out. It’s too hard; people don’t want it. Not truly. We are selfish. We get caught up in the things of this world; we get by just fine living our lives, never embracing our deepest selves.

Community is shaped around the table, in conversation, in getting to know one another, in living alongside one another, in choosing one another. Community is doing one another's dishes before we go back to our own dwelling. And not to force this horribly obvious transition, but what a joyous occasion when those dishes can be kept to a minimum.

I love this meal I’m going to share because it does just that. This meal is like community. It’s simple, yet profound.  It is a dish full of grace, which let’s be honest—all communities need to be. This dish looks at it’s own imperfections instead of pointing out the imperfections of other dishes. To top it off, it has all the necessary pieces of a well-balanced meal while sticking to one casserole dish and maybe a bowl or two. It has the veggies, the meat, the potatoes, and the bread. In my eyes, it is truly the perfect community dish. And now, I share it with you to share with your community as it was once shared with me.

Chicken Pot Pie:

1. Set the oven to 375 degrees.

  • Sauté 1/2 cup of chopped onion.
  • Add 1 cup of butter—Usually two sticks.

2. Once melted, add dry ingredients:

  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. dried thyme
  • ½ tsp-1 tsp. pepper

3. Stir in wet ingredients:

  • 3 cups chicken broth (or veggie!!)
  • 1.5 cups of milk (or non-dairy sub)

4. Stir until thickens

5. Add:

  • 1 bag of frozen veggies. I usually do Trader Joe’s Organic Foursome
  • Shredded chicken (leftovers are GREAT for this!!)

6. As those ingredients are combining, I place those little frozen, garlic potato pods (also from Trader Joe’s) along the bottom of a large casserole dish with a splash of milk).

7. Pour the blend from the pan over the potatoes.

8. The Topper: in a medium sized bowl, whisk the following:

  • 2 cups of your favorite biscuit mix
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup milk.

The consistency should be a little thick, but not too thick. This part may take a little practice. You should be in love with the topper. If you’re not, try the recipe with halved, uncooked biscuits instead.

9. Put in oven for 30 minutes:

10-15 minutes in, put slits in the topper. I don’t know if this does anything to the meal itself, but it sure does look pretty!!

Enjoy this meal. Love one another deeply. Pray for and with one another.

For dessert, I recommend a round of Ticket to Ride :)

Overall shopping list:

  • 1 onion
  • butter
  • flour
  • milk (or non dairy sub)
  • chicken broth (or equivalent)
  • salt, pepper, and thyme
  • 1 bag frozen veggies
  • chicken
  • frozen potato pods
  • biscuit mix
  • eggs

OH YEAH! One more thing: This is a great recipe to take to people's homes if they are sick, just had a baby, lost a loved one, etc. I suggest doing so in a throw away tin dish so as to not burden them with cleaning and keeping track of dishes afterwards.

 

 

Cold Brew + Summertime Feels // Featuring Heritage Roasting Co.

I mentioned a few posts back how I'm struggling to carve out space to write regularly. Update: this is still true, and that's all on that. What I'm really here to tell you is that when I was pregnant with my daughter, the idea of ingesting anything hot made me want to throw up on the spot. Literally (like, really…literally), simply the thought of something hot made me gag. And when I say gag, I don't mean first trimester, just in the morning gagging. I mean all day, every day, month upon month upon month gagging. It was truly a joyous time of creating life. . .

Fortunately—and this is a big fortunately, the smell of coffee didn't bother me. So, that spring I started making regular batches of Cold Brew Coffee for my early morning shifts. At the time, I was concerned I would forevermore avoid cold, coffee beverages like many women do with edibles they eat and drink a lot of during pregnancy sickness. I am happy to report two years later, however, that I'm still on the cold brew wagon. I’m also thrilled to report that this second pregnancy is nothing like the first as far as the nasty all day, every day sickness. P.T.L.

So far this spring, I've made a couple batches of cold brew and still love it. And while part of my brain is now saying, "uh oh…the humid, NJ/Philly summer must be upon us," the other part is celebrating because it knows this isn’t true, knows that I now live in Bay Area, and understands that I can simple enjoy this coffee beverage sans the sweat and 100 degree weather. Again, hallelujah! That part of my brain and I are pretty excited about this. Stay cool, my friends and enjoy!

To make your own, super easy Cold Brew:

  •  Mix 1/3 cup of fine coffee grinds to every three cups cool water in a glass container with a lid
  •  Allow it to sit covered on the counter overnight
  • Filter it and put it in the fridge the next morning

And now, for a longer list of side notes than recipe instructions:

  • I only like dark roasts when drinking hot coffee, but I like using medium roasts for cold brew—don’t know why; there’s probably science involved.
  • I use a French Press to filter out the grinds.
  • C.B. tends to be less bitter than hot coffee on account of using cold water—or again, something equally scientific like that.
  • Lastly, this should be fairly concentrated, so it may be too strong for your taste. You can add more water when you drink it or do as I do and add milk. I drink hot coffee black, but I prefer milk in my C.B.

That’s it! As always, thanks for you reading.

The coffee I used for this batch comes from the lovely people of Heritage Roasting Co.
These folks in Shasta Lake, CA seriously love their community and are continuously expanding their community center to serve the needs of those around them. What's not to love about people who make great coffee and love people so well? Check them out:

Heritage Roasting Co. // 4302 Shasta Dam Blvd, Shasta Lake, CA 96019
IG // Facebook

When Life Gives You Lemons...Make Coffee // My First Recipe Share

I will start by saying this: I don't like sharing. As someone who LOVES being around people and hosting people, I specifically don't like to share recipes. In fear that I might miss out on hangout time, it's like I want people to rely on my presence for certain delicious foods and drinks. Totally insecure and delusional--I understand. Fortunately, there's enough love in my life that I'm slowly able to let these irrational ideas go (yes, ideaS--there are others). So, this is me saying--I want to share this thing I love with you even at the risk of losing some time spent with you.

Now that that's off my chest--here goes...

A couple years ago, I stumbled upon a drink recipe on the internet. I sadly don't remember where it was, but I remember that the blog writer who shared the recipe said it was a drink they discovered in a cafe in Sweden.

The drink was Coffee+Lemonade.

WHAT?!

In Germany, I had cola mixed with a certain type of beer, and that was weird. A couple Christmases ago, I started mixing Egg Nog with Ginger Beer--again, strange. But, learning about lemonade mixed with coffee was a whole other category of combinations I'd never think of on my own. You know..."Like lamb and tuna fish."

Or was it...?

It most definitely was not. This drink quickly became my dearest, most refreshing coffee friend. I've made this recipe more times than I could keep track, and have won over many-a-convert to the lemonade + coffee blend.

Since discovering this fresh, home-made deliciousness, I've done a lot of experimenting. I've tried:

  • Cutting out the need for fresh lemons by making lemonade in advance and adding it to the cold brew.
  • Mixing a bottle of yummy Trader Joe's Organic Lemonade with my cold brew.
  • Adding more lemon to my simple syrup, so as to cut out the need for a fresh lemons come drinking time.
  • Using oranges since I always have those on hand. It was WAY too sweet and lacked the tartness that makes it so great.
  • And lastly, and worst of all, forcing a cup of hot coffee to get cold quickly by adding ice (yuck!).

So, when I tell you that making this refreshing twist of a coffee beverage from scratch is a necessity--I mean it. That also means there's a need to prepare for all of the ingredients in advance.

Last thing: if you're weirded out by the idea of coffee and lemon, think about the fact that adding lemon or lemonade to black tea is completely normal. That usually helps people get past the weird factor.

And...ENJOY! Also, thank you to the one who originally shared this recipe online, so others could too!!

Coffee Lemonade //

Based on your sweet, bitter, and sour preferences, you should totally play with the measurements on this, but here's what I do:

  • 1 Cup of Ice
  • 1/2 Part Cold Brew Coffee (Stir 1/3 cup fine coffee grinds to every 3 cups cold water in a sealed container and let sit overnight on the counter. Strain and place in fridge. I use a glass jar with a lid for the brewing and a French Press to strain).
  • 1/2 Part Home-Made Lemon Simple Syrup that has cooled in the fridge (Boil 1 cup sugar to every 1 cup water to every lemon juice and zest from half of a FRESH lemon for one minute or so, and let sit until it thickens.)
  • Top each serving off with juice from half of a lemon.

Cold Coffee + Sweet + Tart. Yum!!

Just to reiterate, I promise you I've tried every shortcut in the book on this recipe, and this is truly the way to go. IF (and it is a big IF) you're reallllly craving some Coffee Lemonade and never seem to have lemons on hand, getting good. I mean--GOOD. Lemonade and mixing it with cold brew can work. BUT, everything fresh and made by your hands is definitely the best way to go.

I hope you enjoy!! Tag me if you decide to make yourself a delicious batch--I want to hear what you think :) Also, do you have any weird recipe combinations that you love? Share below!!

Thanks and Blessings from Oakland.